About beanz Magazine

We’re a small community of teachers, technologists, and writers who love the challenge of exploring technology in ways kids and non-technical adults enjoy and understand. We try to make technology accessible, friendly, and fun.

Our Community of Writers

Erin Winick

Erin is a Mechanical Engineer and currently Associate Editor at MIT’s Technology Review. She’s interested in 3D printing, fashion, women in STEAM careers, and many other topics.

Amy S Hansen

Amy is an award-winning science writer for kids who has published 25 books. For beanz, she writes about how technology is used in science.

Tim McGuigan

Tim is a middle school Computer Science and Robotics teacher and the Farrell Chair for Innovation at Shady Side Academy in Ohio. For beanz, he writes about the challenges of teaching STEAM to kids.

Jennifer Newell

Jennifer is a Google-certified middle and grade school teacher in the Oakland, California area interested in robotics and electronics.

Bonnie Roskes

Bonnie is a 3D and SketchUp modeling software expert and trainer at 3Dvinci.net from Washington DC.

Clarissa Littler

Clarissa is a math, physics, and computer science researcher from Portland, Oregon who also is interested in differences between programming languages. She also writes about Scratch.

Les Pounder

Les is a long time freelance writer about the Raspberry Pi, micro:bit, and other electronics. He is based in the United Kingdom.

Simon Batt

Simon is a freelance writer who loves Minecraft, secret codes, fiction, technology, history, and cats. He’s also based in the United Kingdom.

Patricia Foster

Patricia is a recent graduate in programming and computer science in Canada. She’s interested in programming projects for kids.

Tim Slavin

Tim is an award-winning writer and technologist who enjoys teaching programming and computer science topics to kids and non-technical people.

Kelley Lanuto

Kelley is an award-winning designer of books and magazines for kids. She creates our print magazine every two months.

Why beanz?

Kids and adults are surrounded by technology in our daily lives. Understanding technology helps us understand and control and make good use of technology instead of being overwhelmed or controlled by technology. beanz is a fun and thoughtful way to expose children and adults to STEAM concepts, programming, and issues around technology use.

About the Magazine

beanz magazine is a bi-monthly online and print magazine about learning to code, computer science, and how we use technology in our daily lives. The magazine includes hard to find information, for example, a list of 40+ programming languages for education, coding schools, summer tech camps, and more.

While the magazine is written to help kids ages 8 and older learn about programming and computer science, many readers and subscribers are parents, teachers, and librarians who use the articles to learn alongside their young kids, students, or library patrons. The magazine strives to provide easy to understand how-to information, with a bit of quirky fun.

The magazine is published in print and online six times a year, on the first day of February, April, June, August, October, and December. Subscribers support the magazine. There is no advertising to distract readers.

The magazine also has won several awards The magazine also is a member of the Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA).

Editorial Focus

The magazine is more about journalism than curriculum. We focus on how kids, parents, and teachers learn about programming and computer science, as well as how technology fits into our daily lives. The magazine helps readers understand and master technology and not be its slave.

The magazine explores these topics:

  • Basics of programming and where to learn more
  • Problem solving and collaboration
  • Mathematical foundations of computing and computer science
  • Computational thinking
  • Recognizing and selecting computer devices
  • Community, global, and ethical impacts of technology

These topics are distilled from the Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA) curriculum guidelines for teaching computer science. A number of the how-to articles in the magazine were approved by the CSTA as meeting their standards.

For readers who find coding fun, learning a programming language is only a start. They also need to learn how to debug code, choose technology, define and solve problems, and many other skills and concepts. Kids, Code, and Computer Science provides a high level view of what new coders need to know to become great coders. With links to learn more.

For readers bored by coding, the magazine can help them dive into computer science concepts, problems, and challenges in a friendly way. They also can learn the limits of technology, as well as what makes technology so amazing.

Reader questions and ideas are encouraged and help develop story ideas. Please use the Contact page to reach us.